• Amended version of the proposal for the Ethics Code : to vote for on the GA
    by ISPA Web on July 15, 2021 at 8:09 am

    Following yesterday’s Leadership Workshop (July 14), we are publishing this modified version of the Ethics Code proposal. Only minor changes were made after ISPA’s Leadership Workshop and this will be the version to be voted on at the GA this afternoon.   The Ethics Forum is still accessible online and can still be used for posting comments [...] The post Amended version of the proposal for the Ethics Code : to vote for on the GA appeared first on ISPA.

  • Amended version of the proposal for the Ethics Code : to vote for on the GA
    by ISPA Web on July 15, 2021 at 7:54 am

    Following yesterday's Leadership Workshop (July 14), we are publishing this modified version of the Ethics Code proposal. Only minor changes were made after ISPA's Leadership Workshop and this will be the version to be voted on at the GA this afternoon.   The Ethics Forum is still accessible online and can still be used for posting comments [...] The post Amended version of the proposal for the Ethics Code : to vote for on the GA appeared first on ISPA.

  • Final draft of revised Code of Ethics: to vote for on the GA on July 15
    by ISPA Web on July 8, 2021 at 1:53 pm

    On behalf of the ISPA Ethics Committee we present you the draft if the  revised Code of Ethics. Read it here on our website. This is the version that the General Assembly will vote upon on July 15. The Ethics Forum is still accessible online and can still be used for posting comments or questions. The post Final draft of revised Code of Ethics: to vote for on the GA on July 15 appeared first on ISPA.

  • Final draft of revised Code of Ethics: to vote for on the GA on July 15
    by ISPA Web on July 8, 2021 at 1:43 pm

    On behalf of the ISPA Ethics Committee we present you the draft if the  revised Code of Ethics. Read it here on our website. This is the version that the General Assembly will vote upon on July 15. The Ethics Forum is still accessible online and can still be used for posting comments or questions.     The post Final draft of revised Code of Ethics: to vote for on the GA on July 15 appeared first on ISPA.

  • Revision of ISPA’s Code of Ethics – Call for Discussion
    by ISPA Web on June 14, 2021 at 12:04 pm

    After the COVID-19 pandemic, the International School Psychology Association (ISPA) is resuming its normal functioning. An example of this is the Annual Conference which will once again take place in July (this year in a hybrid format). Therefore, as we count down to the Conference, several of ISPA's Committees and Task Forces are finalizing key [...] The post Revision of ISPA’s Code of Ethics – Call for Discussion appeared first on ISPA.

  • free webinar on psychoeducational evaluations of students with visual impairments
    by ISPA Web on June 4, 2021 at 7:56 am

    We would like to invite school psychologists to our free webinar about the panel discussion on psychoeducational evaluations of students with visual impairments. BVIPsych Couch Chat Webinar Date: Wednesday, June 9th, 2021 Time: 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM PT  (1 PM - 2:30 PM MT, 2 PM - 3:30 PM CT, 3 PM - 4:30 PM ET) [...] The post free webinar on psychoeducational evaluations of students with visual impairments appeared first on ISPA.

  • CIRP Outstanding Dissertation Award
    by ISPA Web on June 4, 2021 at 7:47 am

    The Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP) strives to foster a global perspective within APA and within the psychology community. It facilitates exchanges between psychologists in the U.S. and colleagues abroad, promotes a global perspective within psychology, and encourages involvement of psychology in international program, policy, and educational settings. To this end, CIRP sponsors [...] The post CIRP Outstanding Dissertation Award appeared first on ISPA.

  • Breaking the Stigma on Mental Illness
    by noreply@blogger.com (Psyched About School) on June 3, 2021 at 7:40 pm

    by Angela Fernandez, School PsychologistAlthough Mental Health Awareness Month has come to an end, the need for awareness and acceptance of mental illness has not. I encourage you to read on to learn more about mental illness, stigma, and steps you can take to help end the stigma associated with mental illness. Let’s first talk about what it means to have a mental illness. According to the American Psychiatric Association (2021), a mental illness is a condition defined by a combination of changes in thought patterns, emotions, and behavior that cause distress and/or dysfunction in social, family, and/or school/work activities. But I’m not aware of anyone who has a mental illness, so it must not be THAT common, right? Wrong! Mental illnesses are very common. So far in 2021, 19% of adults in the United States of America are experiencing a mental illness. That is over 47 million Americans (Mental Health America, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive, 2021)! Children are also affected by mental illness. In 2016, 16.5% of American children ages 6-17 experienced a mental health disorder. That is around 7.7 million children (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2021)! Keep in mind that these numbers do not include Substance Abuse Disorders or unreported/undiagnosed mental illnesses. It is likely that there are many individuals who are experiencing a mental illness who have not received a diagnosis or who have not accessed support… This means that mental illnesses are likely under-reported. Now let’s talk about stigma. You have probably heard the term before, but what does it mean? According to the American Psychiatric Association (2021), stigma around mental illness can be defined as the negative views or feelings towards individuals with mental illness. These may lead to fear, mistreatment, and the spread of false information or beliefs about individuals with mental illness. Stigma is often caused by a misunderstanding or misinterpretation of what it means to have a mental health condition, as well as false portrayals of what it “looks like” by the media. Stigma is typically thought of as coming from others. However, self-stigma also exists. There are negative feelings, ideas, and beliefs that individuals with mental illness may have about their own mental health or condition. Individuals with mental illness may have feelings of embarrassment, shame, or guilt because of stigma. Is this stigma a serious problem? It would take an entire book to touch on all the reasons why stigma around mental illness is a serious problem. One of the biggest reasons is that more than half of individuals living with mental illness do not get support or help for their illness due to their concern of how they might be viewed if they do (Mental Health America, 2021). Cultural values may also impact someone’s decision to seek treatment. Untreated mental illnesses can be debilitating and have the potential to lead to exacerbated symptoms and even suicide. How Can You Help? Educate Yourself and Others.Stigma often comes from a lack of knowledge or misunderstanding about mental illness. By educating yourself on mental illnesses, you will develop a greater understanding of different conditions, their symptoms, and treatments. You will learn about different resources available. You will also learn how to best support individuals who are living with these conditions. Having this knowledge will help fight any stigma you may have around mental illnesses, whether it be implicit (outside of your immediate awareness) or explicit (within your awareness). Additionally, you will be able to identify false information and beliefs that you may hear being spread. By educating yourself on mental illness, you are becoming more equipped to disrupt this chain of false ideas being spread that contribute to the stigma. If you find yourself in this situation, take the opportunity to share facts. Keep in mind that it is very possible (and likely) that those feeding the stigma may not be doing it with ill intent. They might not even realize they are doing it at all! For this reason, I suggest you share facts in a non-confrontational, non-judgemental manner. Talk Openly About It.Talking openly about mental illness helps to make the topic less taboo. Many people feel that they cannot or should not talk about mental health. The more you talk about it, the more it normalizes it. It’s possible that talking with others about your own personal experiences with mental health could make them feel more comfortable to open up, too. You could be the first person that has talked to them about it. Hearing your experiences might help them feel more supported and less alone. You could be the reason someone feels heard or decides to get help!Treat Physical and Mental Health Equally.Mental health IS just as important as physical health, and it should be treated as such! We live in a society that is comfortable with the idea of taking a day or two off for being physically ill but uncomfortable taking time off to prioritize mental wellbeing. Fortunately, society seems to be moving in the right direction and “mental health days” are becoming more popular/accepted. However, there still seems to be more guilt and shame associated with taking a mental health day than with taking a day off for a physical illness. Learning about the ways mental health and physical health are connected will help to fight those feelings of shame or guilt. Declining mental health is associated with declining physical health and vice versa. Advocate for the importance of your mental health and the mental health of others! No one should feel shame for taking care of their mental health. Pay Attention to the Language You Use.Our words have power. Sometimes they have more power than we realize! That is why it is important that we try to be cognizant of our word choices. There are expressions we have heard for so long that, as a result, we don’t naturally think twice about the meanings behind them. A couple of examples include saying something is making you “crazy”, calling the weather “bipolar”, saying that someone is “so OCD” because they are tidy, and saying that something unpleasant makes you “want to kill yourself”. These are just a few examples of hurtful expressions that use mental illnesses in derogatory ways. When reading these examples, you might notice that the common theme in each of them is that mental illnesses are being used to describe something that is viewed negatively. Using language like this adds to the stigma around mental illness. You may find that you use one of these expressions yourself, and it is likely that you have never thought too deeply about it. It is OKAY that you have in the past, forgive yourself. What is important is that you do your best to be mindful of the language you use from here on out. I will admit that I have personally been working to catch myself using “crazy” as a descriptor. It has been a part of my vocabulary for so many years before it was brought to my attention, and as a result, using it has become a habit. When I catch myself using it, I apologize and then correct myself with a different word that is more appropriate (and less hurtful) for what I am trying to express. It may not be easy and you might find yourself slipping up, but what is important is that you are aware and are working to get better! If you hear others using mental illnesses in derogatory ways, bring it to their attention. They might not realize that their words are hurtful or that they are contributing to the stigma. I challenge you to actively listen for these expressions/phrases and to take action when you do. I hope that this blog has inspired you to take an active role in breaking the stigma! Millions of people are counting on you to speak up and advocate. Spread awareness, spread acceptance, spread facts, and spread love! Together we can create a world that is more accepting and supportive!Resources:https://www.centracare.com/blog/2019/may/break-the-stigma/https://mhanational.org/issues/2021/mental-health-america-prevalence-datahttps://www.nami.org/mhstatshttps://mhanational.org/issues/2020/mental-health-america-access-care-datahttps://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/stigma-and-discrimination